Ecological Research

  • STATISTICS

    Statistics in 2016
    Submitted: 469
    Accepted: 98

    Statistics in the 6 months (Jul. 1 to Dec. 31, 2016)
    Average for first decision: 27.3 (days)

    Statistics in the current issue (vol. 32, issue 2)
    Days for acceptance:
    144 (37–293)
    Days for online-first:
    158 (50–308)
    Days for publication:
    209 (90–375)

FORUM

  • Online First

  • Citizen science: a new approach to advance ecology, education, and conservation

  • Kobori H, Dickinson JL, Washitani I, Sakurai R, Amano T, Komatsu N, Kitamura W, Takagawa S, Koyama K, Ogawara T & Miller-Rushing AJ
    OA

    Citizen science: a new approach to advance ecology, education, and conservation

    Keywords: Citizen science; History; Human-natural system; Web-based approach; Worldwide case studies

    Abstract Citizen science has a long history in the ecological sciences and has made substantial contributions to science, education, and society. Developments in information technology during the last few decades have created new opportunities for citizen science to engage ever larger audiences of volunteers to help address some of ecology's most pressing issues, such as global environmental change. Using online tools, volunteers can find projects that match their interests and learn the skills and protocols required to develop questions, collect data, submit data, and help process and analyze data online. Citizen science has become increasingly important for its ability to engage large numbers of volunteers to generate observations at scales or resolutions unattainable by individual researchers. As a coupled natural and human approach, citizen science can also help researchers access local knowledge and implement conservation projects that might be impossible otherwise. In Japan, however, the value of citizen science to science and society is still underappreciated. Here we present case studies of citizen science in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom, and describe how citizen science is used to tackle key questions in ecology and conservation, including spatial and macro-ecology, management of threatened and invasive species, and monitoring of biodiversity. We also discuss the importance of data quality, volunteer recruitment, program evaluation, and the integration of science and human systems in citizen science projects. Finally, we outline some of the primary challenges facing citizen science and its future.